March 2009

Trawling the interwebs this week I came across this little beauty (names have been removed to protect the innocent). There are three issues that are consistently addressed in our work: client needs, purpose, cost + the site, its context, history + materials, light, volume. Hmmmm. I'm guessing there's punctuation missing. Some semicolons probably. Or a comma or six.  But nope, I have...

We've all been there. It's called blank page syndrome. It's that feeling you get when you've been asked to write a report, a press release, a case study or a sales letter. But after 20 minutes you've only typed two words on the page; and that was your name. So where do you start? What technique can you use to get...

Out and about in Wimbledon this week, I spotted this great sign for a local florist.  It's cheap, it's amusing, and it certainly grabbed my attention. And yes, I bought a bunch of daffs. ...

You’ve decided you need a website. You’ve briefed a whizz-bang designer and you’ve found yourself agreeing to write the copy. It can’t be that difficult right? Wrong!Writing successful website copy can be tough. But here are a few tips to get you started. Who’s calling? Have a clear idea of who will be visiting your website. Will they already know about your...

Named after the Oxford University Press where it was first used, the Oxford comma - a comma before the word and - is often avoided in British English but used in the US. For example: In the US they write: Red, white, and blue. In the UK we write: Red, white and blue. For some reason, us Brits often feel quite weird...

Imagine yourself at a party; glass of warm punch in one hand, cold sausage roll in the other. And you're trapped with the party bore. He's giving you a speech about his latest achievements; the speed of his car; his golf handicap; and his plans for world domination. You can't get a word in edgeways and he doesn't ask you...