F***ing hell. Is it ok to swear now?

In honour of English Language Day last week I tweeted an old blog post about Anglo Saxon words. On Twitter @CiaranNorris replied “because Anglo Saxon words are ****ing great.” (Ciaran’s asterisks.)

Indeed.

It’s not cool to swear though, right? Or is it? Once frowned upon as showing lack of intelligence it now seems perfectly acceptable to cuss.

Stephen Fry, the cunning linguist says of swearing “the sort of twee person who thinks swearing is in any way a sign of a lack of education or of a lack of verbal interest is a f***ing lunatic.”

In an article in Stylist magazine last week they wrote that swearing had been scientifically proven to “ease pain, increase productivity and bond us at work”. F***ing hell. That’s impressive.

I remember the Sex Pistols back in the 70s (look it up kids) going on an expletive rampage when interviewed on TV. There was shock and outrage and parents ran to cover their children’s ears.

And yet turn on your TV these days and you’ll hear the likes of Gordon Ramsay turning the air blue whilst making an awfully nice lobster salad. Gordy’s show is even called The F Word.

So yelling a cuss word because you’ve got a parking ticket, broken your leg, or because you’re under stress at work all seem acceptable.

But how about writing swearwords? Is it OK to write f*ck, sh*t or b*llocks in your article, blog or tweet?

We try and get around it, of course, by substituting an asterisk for one or some of the letters as if this will protect the innocent or at least blame the reader for having a dirty mind. “Oh you saw sh*t and read it as shit did you? That’s your fault then. What I meant was shut.”

And then we end up with the sort of nonsense you get in the Sunday papers where you’re left wondering what the swearwords actually are. “Racquel, the 22 year old escort accused the premiership footballer of having a small p**** being s***** and a b***** a******. “

The Guardian regularly uses sh*t (sans asterisk) and even had f*ck on the front page recently. (Just for the record they’re using b*stard less whilst w*anker has remained stable.)

Cursebird monitors swearing on Twitter in a real time feed. And there’s loads of it. At the time of writing f*ck and sh*t are leading the way closely followed by b*tch and p*ss. Nice.

The talented @naomidunford over at Ittybiz doesn’t give a sh*t about swearwords and is famous for effing and blinding her way through her blog posts. It hasn’t bothered her readers and she’s got a huge following.

But I’m not so sure it’s for everybody. I once wrote that you shouldn’t say anything on Twitter that you wouldn’t say to your mum. And I think that includes swearwords. Yeah, the asterisk thing is a bit of a cop out I know. But it does acknowledge that you’ve given some thought to other people’s feelings.

What do you think? Should we refrain from cussing online? Or is it all a load of Anglo Saxon b*llocks?

Let us know in the comments.

54 Comments
  • Andy Nattan
    Posted at 12:40h, 22 October Reply

    F*ck knows.

  • Andy Nattan
    Posted at 12:40h, 22 October Reply

    F*ck knows.

  • Alconcalcia
    Posted at 12:45h, 22 October Reply

    I tend to avoid using swear words when tweeting, though in answer to the hashtag #bbccuts yesterday I did suggest the programme “The Shit life”. In real life I tend to remember the monologue by Billy Connolly about how sometimes a ‘bloody’ or a ‘damned’ just isn’t enough – and it’s true. And, after all, they are only words. Mind you, having two young children around I have to bite my lip because the younger one often repeat things parrot fashion!

  • Alconcalcia
    Posted at 12:45h, 22 October Reply

    I tend to avoid using swear words when tweeting, though in answer to the hashtag #bbccuts yesterday I did suggest the programme “The Shit life”. In real life I tend to remember the monologue by Billy Connolly about how sometimes a ‘bloody’ or a ‘damned’ just isn’t enough – and it’s true. And, after all, they are only words. Mind you, having two young children around I have to bite my lip because the younger one often repeat things parrot fashion!

  • Matt Hill
    Posted at 13:17h, 22 October Reply

    It shouldn’t really matter, I guess. But whenever I read a serious article that contains a lot of swearing I can’t help but think the writer has sold themselves short. I’ve stopped following ranty swearers on Twitter for the same reason.

    I had this discussion with an ex-boss of mine, who swears all the time online. He argued it’s his personality and “fuck anyone who doesn’t want to read it”. Fair enough I suppose. But I know he’s capable of much more compelling, intelligent language and swearing just seems a cop out against writing something better in the first place.

    I honestly think a lot of swearing in an article just makes you look like a moron. You might not have intended that, but that’s the way I see it. We’re adults, not kids in the playground who’ve only just discovered the power of a rude word.

  • Matt Hill
    Posted at 13:17h, 22 October Reply

    It shouldn’t really matter, I guess. But whenever I read a serious article that contains a lot of swearing I can’t help but think the writer has sold themselves short. I’ve stopped following ranty swearers on Twitter for the same reason.

    I had this discussion with an ex-boss of mine, who swears all the time online. He argued it’s his personality and “fuck anyone who doesn’t want to read it”. Fair enough I suppose. But I know he’s capable of much more compelling, intelligent language and swearing just seems a cop out against writing something better in the first place.

    I honestly think a lot of swearing in an article just makes you look like a moron. You might not have intended that, but that’s the way I see it. We’re adults, not kids in the playground who’ve only just discovered the power of a rude word.

  • Jason Regan
    Posted at 13:19h, 22 October Reply

    Must say, I felt that Cee Lo Green having to record two versions of F**k You was totally unnecessary given that the song had already hit before any radio play occurred. The safe version completely lost the edge and indignant attitude, not to mention that the audacity of a lyric that blatant made me laugh every time I heard it.

  • Jason Regan
    Posted at 13:19h, 22 October Reply

    Must say, I felt that Cee Lo Green having to record two versions of F**k You was totally unnecessary given that the song had already hit before any radio play occurred. The safe version completely lost the edge and indignant attitude, not to mention that the audacity of a lyric that blatant made me laugh every time I heard it.

  • Annette Peppis
    Posted at 13:27h, 22 October Reply

    Prospective employers may be looking at your blog or tweets (tweets are shown on LinkedIn) so I think the same rules apply as when you are at an interview: swear words are unacceptable.

  • Annette Peppis
    Posted at 13:27h, 22 October Reply

    Prospective employers may be looking at your blog or tweets (tweets are shown on LinkedIn) so I think the same rules apply as when you are at an interview: swear words are unacceptable.

  • Rowena
    Posted at 13:42h, 22 October Reply

    I think swear words should be subject to the same rules as any words that we choose to use, especially as copywriters – ie do they add to the point you’re trying to make, or detract from it? Will gratuitous swearing get the point across as well as a cuttingly accurate but perhaps more considered word? Or does the occasion really call for nothing less than a damn good F word?

  • Rowena
    Posted at 13:42h, 22 October Reply

    I think swear words should be subject to the same rules as any words that we choose to use, especially as copywriters – ie do they add to the point you’re trying to make, or detract from it? Will gratuitous swearing get the point across as well as a cuttingly accurate but perhaps more considered word? Or does the occasion really call for nothing less than a damn good F word?

  • Helen S Harris
    Posted at 15:39h, 22 October Reply

    Anyone who says swearing doesn’t make you feel better is talking a load of b*ll*cks. However. I do feel that it’s a case of quality of quantity. An unexpected blasphemous outbreak is far more entertaining than a torrent of expletives used as a replacement for adjectives. People are often shocked when I swear out loud in public, to which I respond, “B*ll*[email protected]^gger-f^ck!” … and a demure smile!

  • Helen S Harris
    Posted at 15:39h, 22 October Reply

    Anyone who says swearing doesn’t make you feel better is talking a load of b*ll*cks. However. I do feel that it’s a case of quality of quantity. An unexpected blasphemous outbreak is far more entertaining than a torrent of expletives used as a replacement for adjectives. People are often shocked when I swear out loud in public, to which I respond, “B*ll*[email protected]^gger-f^ck!” … and a demure smile!

  • Elizabeth
    Posted at 16:22h, 22 October Reply

    Interesting article. Perhaps I’m old fashioned. The English language is so wonderfully diverse it seems a shame to use such unimaginative and limited vocabulary. For me, I still think if you can’t say anything nice don’t bother. Or if really in need of a good venting “pants” said with enough gusto work a treat 😉

  • Elizabeth
    Posted at 16:22h, 22 October Reply

    Interesting article. Perhaps I’m old fashioned. The English language is so wonderfully diverse it seems a shame to use such unimaginative and limited vocabulary. For me, I still think if you can’t say anything nice don’t bother. Or if really in need of a good venting “pants” said with enough gusto work a treat 😉

  • Alconcalcia
    Posted at 16:47h, 22 October Reply

    I would add that when I see swearing on Twitter as part of an attempt at humour it doesn’t take too many asterisked words (or sometimes written out in full) for it to become irritating and juvenile rather than funny.

    I told one quite high profile Tweeter months ago that I liked their page but felt they overdid the swearing. They wrote back saying they’d been doing comedy for 12 years so ‘I think I know what I’m doing’ but I did notice it toned down a bit after that. It just doesn’t scan well when you’ve too many effs and blinds in a 140 character tweet.

    Or, as they say in Curb Your Enthusiasm, “WTF Larry?”

  • Alconcalcia
    Posted at 16:47h, 22 October Reply

    I would add that when I see swearing on Twitter as part of an attempt at humour it doesn’t take too many asterisked words (or sometimes written out in full) for it to become irritating and juvenile rather than funny.

    I told one quite high profile Tweeter months ago that I liked their page but felt they overdid the swearing. They wrote back saying they’d been doing comedy for 12 years so ‘I think I know what I’m doing’ but I did notice it toned down a bit after that. It just doesn’t scan well when you’ve too many effs and blinds in a 140 character tweet.

    Or, as they say in Curb Your Enthusiasm, “WTF Larry?”

  • Age
    Posted at 18:03h, 22 October Reply

    Nevermind swearing online, is it acceptable to swear (loudly) in an office environment? I’m always hearing loud-mouthed sales people swearing at each other while they’re on or off the phone. Hmmm, professional.

    I would never write profanity in a work blog or website page, it’s not professional. But that depends on the industry I suppose. For personal stuff, I try to think of the innocent people who might be watching, but you don’t always need to use a *. Numbers work well too. Sh1t, fuck3r, b0ll0cks. Ooh, liberating.

  • Age
    Posted at 18:03h, 22 October Reply

    Nevermind swearing online, is it acceptable to swear (loudly) in an office environment? I’m always hearing loud-mouthed sales people swearing at each other while they’re on or off the phone. Hmmm, professional.

    I would never write profanity in a work blog or website page, it’s not professional. But that depends on the industry I suppose. For personal stuff, I try to think of the innocent people who might be watching, but you don’t always need to use a *. Numbers work well too. Sh1t, fuck3r, b0ll0cks. Ooh, liberating.

  • Lorraine
    Posted at 20:12h, 22 October Reply

    Brave of you to blog on this touchy subject, Sarah.

    Swearing is ubiquitous in digital media right now, isn’t it? Stevedore-style cussing even seems
    a key part of personal branding for a number of bloggers and online marketers.

    Maybe the phenomenon is part of digital and social media’s evolution. Up until recently, the Internet has been the Wild West: Marketers, journalists and entrepreneurs have been able to make up rules–of business and etiquette–as they go along.

    But the landscape is changing. Big and medium sized businesses and brands are moving in. And we don’t know how they’ll use digital/social platforms nor how online marketing “best practices” and language will change.

    I suppose this is a long-winded way of saying, “Know thy customer.” If your clients are edgy start-ups and fellow online marketers, swearing may convey I’m cool-insider status.

    I enjoy swearing as much anyone. But I feel vulgar spelling out swear words in writing. And I’m also a little afraid. Not of my mum–may she rest in peace. I admit I’m wary of corporate clients’ reactions. I cringe to think of them running into an F-bomb in my Tweetstream.

  • Lorraine
    Posted at 20:12h, 22 October Reply

    Brave of you to blog on this touchy subject, Sarah.

    Swearing is ubiquitous in digital media right now, isn’t it? Stevedore-style cussing even seems
    a key part of personal branding for a number of bloggers and online marketers.

    Maybe the phenomenon is part of digital and social media’s evolution. Up until recently, the Internet has been the Wild West: Marketers, journalists and entrepreneurs have been able to make up rules–of business and etiquette–as they go along.

    But the landscape is changing. Big and medium sized businesses and brands are moving in. And we don’t know how they’ll use digital/social platforms nor how online marketing “best practices” and language will change.

    I suppose this is a long-winded way of saying, “Know thy customer.” If your clients are edgy start-ups and fellow online marketers, swearing may convey I’m cool-insider status.

    I enjoy swearing as much anyone. But I feel vulgar spelling out swear words in writing. And I’m also a little afraid. Not of my mum–may she rest in peace. I admit I’m wary of corporate clients’ reactions. I cringe to think of them running into an F-bomb in my Tweetstream.

  • test
    Posted at 21:46h, 22 October Reply

    99% of the time I find cursing off-putting in the extreme. For the most part, I think foul language detracts from whatever a person is trying to communicate (I’m speaking about business oriented writing here). There are, however, writers who can use profanity to hilarious and persuasive effect. Much like humor, if you’ve got a sense of the profane, use it. If not, stay the f*ck away.

  • test
    Posted at 21:46h, 22 October Reply

    99% of the time I find cursing off-putting in the extreme. For the most part, I think foul language detracts from whatever a person is trying to communicate (I’m speaking about business oriented writing here). There are, however, writers who can use profanity to hilarious and persuasive effect. Much like humor, if you’ve got a sense of the profane, use it. If not, stay the f*ck away.

  • Richard Hollins
    Posted at 11:46h, 24 October Reply

    I don’t swear on twitter or in my blog for the same reasons I don’t swear in client meetings – it’s not professional and you never know the limits of what other people find acceptable.

    More generally, though, I don’t have any problem with it. A good bit of ranty swearing often brightens up the day.

  • Richard Hollins
    Posted at 11:46h, 24 October Reply

    I don’t swear on twitter or in my blog for the same reasons I don’t swear in client meetings – it’s not professional and you never know the limits of what other people find acceptable.

    More generally, though, I don’t have any problem with it. A good bit of ranty swearing often brightens up the day.

  • Marian Schembari
    Posted at 10:29h, 25 October Reply

    I actually wrote a post about why I DO swear a few months ago and here are my thoughts:

    Occasionally someone tells me to tone down my language because it “undercuts my credibility,” but I feel like there are so many social media blogs, that’s it’s really a relationship to the blogger, that makes you stand out.

    Not everyone likes my personality. I bet every day people read something of mine and immediately leave because they’re offended by my language or hate the way I write. But do you know what? That happens to EVERYONE. Every day I click out of blogs because I think they’re boring, redundant, or just don’t grab my attention. Every day we close our browsers because we don’t like something. We can’t please everyone so might as well be ourselves.

    • Sarah Turner
      Posted at 17:17h, 16 November Reply

      Great comments here guys. And divided opinions.
      Marian refers to the post she wrote on why she does swear. Check it out here.

  • Marian Schembari
    Posted at 10:29h, 25 October Reply

    I actually wrote a post about why I DO swear a few months ago and here are my thoughts:

    Occasionally someone tells me to tone down my language because it “undercuts my credibility,” but I feel like there are so many social media blogs, that’s it’s really a relationship to the blogger, that makes you stand out.

    Not everyone likes my personality. I bet every day people read something of mine and immediately leave because they’re offended by my language or hate the way I write. But do you know what? That happens to EVERYONE. Every day I click out of blogs because I think they’re boring, redundant, or just don’t grab my attention. Every day we close our browsers because we don’t like something. We can’t please everyone so might as well be ourselves.

    • Sarah Turner
      Posted at 17:17h, 16 November Reply

      Great comments here guys. And divided opinions.
      Marian refers to the post she wrote on why she does swear. Check it out here.

  • Rosie
    Posted at 12:28h, 25 October Reply

    I don’t tend to swear very much in my everyday speech, so I very rarely feel the need to do it in writing – a simple “Frick!” or “OMG!” is enough to express shock or surprise, while “Grrr!” conveys annoyance without, hopefully, offending anyone … apart from those who are nervous around growling dogs.

    I was utterly mortified when I condensed a link to share on Twitter using is.gd, and the 4 random letters happened to spell the C-word. A couple of people tweeted me straight away to make me aware of what had happened, thank goodness. I should have double-checked before pasting the link, but I was also astonished that a service as popular as is.gd didn’t have a swear filter for offensive 4-letter words!

  • Rosie
    Posted at 12:28h, 25 October Reply

    I don’t tend to swear very much in my everyday speech, so I very rarely feel the need to do it in writing – a simple “Frick!” or “OMG!” is enough to express shock or surprise, while “Grrr!” conveys annoyance without, hopefully, offending anyone … apart from those who are nervous around growling dogs.

    I was utterly mortified when I condensed a link to share on Twitter using is.gd, and the 4 random letters happened to spell the C-word. A couple of people tweeted me straight away to make me aware of what had happened, thank goodness. I should have double-checked before pasting the link, but I was also astonished that a service as popular as is.gd didn’t have a swear filter for offensive 4-letter words!

  • Rob
    Posted at 17:45h, 25 October Reply

    I agree with Richard’s comment that you never know the limits of what other people find acceptable. I wouldn’t go in to a client meeting and immediately start swearing. But with many of my established clients the swearing flows both ways. And of course whenever I talk to Sarah. 😉

    As with everything moderation is important. Even the fun stuff!

  • Rob
    Posted at 17:45h, 25 October Reply

    I agree with Richard’s comment that you never know the limits of what other people find acceptable. I wouldn’t go in to a client meeting and immediately start swearing. But with many of my established clients the swearing flows both ways. And of course whenever I talk to Sarah. 😉

    As with everything moderation is important. Even the fun stuff!

  • Jon Green
    Posted at 18:11h, 25 October Reply

    I think it’s all about choosing your audience, I guess I wouldn’t swear in front of a client before they had in front of me, unless of course I stubbed my toe.

  • Jon Green
    Posted at 18:11h, 25 October Reply

    I think it’s all about choosing your audience, I guess I wouldn’t swear in front of a client before they had in front of me, unless of course I stubbed my toe.

  • Ultimate Copywriters’ Roll Call: 100 Top International Copywriters and Content Bloggers | MarketCopywriter Blog
    Posted at 14:01h, 26 October Reply

    […] on copywriting, marketing, advertising and wordy stuff by UK copywriter Sarah Turner Great post: F***king hell. Is it okay to swear now? Twitter: […]

  • Ultimate Copywriters’ Roll Call: 100 Top International Copywriters and Content Bloggers | MarketCopywriter Blog
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    […] on copywriting, marketing, advertising and wordy stuff by UK copywriter Sarah Turner Great post: F***king hell. Is it okay to swear now? Twitter: […]

  • Suzan St Maur
    Posted at 10:48h, 16 November Reply

    Your comment about not saying on Twitter anything you wouldn’t say to your mum…my late mum was not one for swearing apart from one time when she had been cleaning out the larder/utility room which she shared with us between their part of the house and ours.

    Aged nearly 80, she emerged from there shouting, “Five f*cking cats between us in this place and what do I find in the utility room? F*cking mouse sh*t.”

    I still laugh when I look back on that…

  • Suzan St Maur
    Posted at 10:48h, 16 November Reply

    Your comment about not saying on Twitter anything you wouldn’t say to your mum…my late mum was not one for swearing apart from one time when she had been cleaning out the larder/utility room which she shared with us between their part of the house and ours.

    Aged nearly 80, she emerged from there shouting, “Five f*cking cats between us in this place and what do I find in the utility room? F*cking mouse sh*t.”

    I still laugh when I look back on that…

  • Morag
    Posted at 11:26h, 16 November Reply

    Ah, swearing. I think there are various things to be considered here (and there have been lots of good points in the comments already)

    There is a HUGE difference between someone whose every second word is fuck and someone who leavens their speech with the occasional swear word. The former is someone who – despite Lord Fry’s comment – has not learned to communicate properly. It’s just the rude equivalent of ummmmm and they might not even notice they are doing it.

    If you can’t carry on a conversation without swearing, I’d say you don’t show yourself in the best light and do in fact make yourself look ignorant. I recall a friend once telling her young daughter off for swearing and saying to us “I don’t know where the fuck she learns this stuff.” Errr, I could make a guess …

    Children learning to swear as part of their normal conversation frighten me to death, because they invest it with such venom. That’s why I don’t generally swear in front of my kids.

    But I do swear. I just keep it for when it is suitable for the company I am with. I would never swear on Twitter – what happens in cyberspace, stays in cyberspace. The trouble with Twitter is that it gives the impression of being ephemeral, but it’s still all there in the history.

    NB My swear-o-meter must be set quite high, because when I was on a run with a friend once, I fell off the kerb into the road and nearly ripped my knee off. But I didn’t swear. It never occurred to me to do so. How would that have helped?

  • Morag
    Posted at 11:26h, 16 November Reply

    Ah, swearing. I think there are various things to be considered here (and there have been lots of good points in the comments already)

    There is a HUGE difference between someone whose every second word is fuck and someone who leavens their speech with the occasional swear word. The former is someone who – despite Lord Fry’s comment – has not learned to communicate properly. It’s just the rude equivalent of ummmmm and they might not even notice they are doing it.

    If you can’t carry on a conversation without swearing, I’d say you don’t show yourself in the best light and do in fact make yourself look ignorant. I recall a friend once telling her young daughter off for swearing and saying to us “I don’t know where the fuck she learns this stuff.” Errr, I could make a guess …

    Children learning to swear as part of their normal conversation frighten me to death, because they invest it with such venom. That’s why I don’t generally swear in front of my kids.

    But I do swear. I just keep it for when it is suitable for the company I am with. I would never swear on Twitter – what happens in cyberspace, stays in cyberspace. The trouble with Twitter is that it gives the impression of being ephemeral, but it’s still all there in the history.

    NB My swear-o-meter must be set quite high, because when I was on a run with a friend once, I fell off the kerb into the road and nearly ripped my knee off. But I didn’t swear. It never occurred to me to do so. How would that have helped?

  • Morag
    Posted at 11:28h, 16 November Reply

    Oh, and I can’t bear juvenile marketing slogans like FCUK – it’s aimed at people who – heaven forbid! – don’t swear but like to feel a little bit edgy. Ooh, I’m so clever for nearly swearing.

    No you’re not. You’re a gullible plonker.

  • Morag
    Posted at 11:28h, 16 November Reply

    Oh, and I can’t bear juvenile marketing slogans like FCUK – it’s aimed at people who – heaven forbid! – don’t swear but like to feel a little bit edgy. Ooh, I’m so clever for nearly swearing.

    No you’re not. You’re a gullible plonker.

  • Andrew Knowles
    Posted at 17:40h, 16 November Reply

    Every now and again I come across swearing in print that looks right. But it’s a rare event.

    In the same way I avoid comedians with a strong line in earthy humour, I bypass those who regularly lace their tweets or blogs with words I’d prefer not to see.

    Are they wrong to speak/write this way? No, and it’s my choice not to listen/read. But are the words really adding value to the content, or are they simply reducing the size audience?

  • Andrew Knowles
    Posted at 17:40h, 16 November Reply

    Every now and again I come across swearing in print that looks right. But it’s a rare event.

    In the same way I avoid comedians with a strong line in earthy humour, I bypass those who regularly lace their tweets or blogs with words I’d prefer not to see.

    Are they wrong to speak/write this way? No, and it’s my choice not to listen/read. But are the words really adding value to the content, or are they simply reducing the size audience?

  • Joy McCarthy
    Posted at 17:43h, 16 November Reply

    I can cuss with the best of them, but I do find it off-putting on Twitter. It’s not about being prudish but with 140 characters, it seems a bit pointless to waste them swearing.

    From a business perspective, I often show clients my Twitter feed when I’m trying to encourage them to use social media. So I’m afraid I don’t want it full of people effing and blinding. I have unfollowed some of the more persistent, or at least removed them from the more visible lists, and hope they get lost in the crowd.

    Of course, the odd typo creeps in and I seem to have been guilty of that recently. I hold my hand up to an inadvertent ‘shat’ when I meant ‘chat’!

  • Joy McCarthy
    Posted at 17:43h, 16 November Reply

    I can cuss with the best of them, but I do find it off-putting on Twitter. It’s not about being prudish but with 140 characters, it seems a bit pointless to waste them swearing.

    From a business perspective, I often show clients my Twitter feed when I’m trying to encourage them to use social media. So I’m afraid I don’t want it full of people effing and blinding. I have unfollowed some of the more persistent, or at least removed them from the more visible lists, and hope they get lost in the crowd.

    Of course, the odd typo creeps in and I seem to have been guilty of that recently. I hold my hand up to an inadvertent ‘shat’ when I meant ‘chat’!

  • Jane Penson
    Posted at 18:53h, 16 November Reply

    Used in the right context swearing in writing can be evocative and appropriate. For example, the dialogue in a novel where the character would be likely to swear a lot, is weakened by a lack of swear words. Out of context, I find it irritating at best and offensive at worst. On a medium like Twitter, where people will form their opinion of you on the basis of what you write, you have to make your mind up who you want to impress. I choose not to swear and I don’t follow people who do. It’s their choice and mine.

  • Jane Penson
    Posted at 18:53h, 16 November Reply

    Used in the right context swearing in writing can be evocative and appropriate. For example, the dialogue in a novel where the character would be likely to swear a lot, is weakened by a lack of swear words. Out of context, I find it irritating at best and offensive at worst. On a medium like Twitter, where people will form their opinion of you on the basis of what you write, you have to make your mind up who you want to impress. I choose not to swear and I don’t follow people who do. It’s their choice and mine.

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    Posted at 10:01h, 01 March Reply

    […] evening. Not even from myself on a particularly bad day for Jazztel’s internet connection. Is it ok to swear so much? People will have different views. But I thought he was bloody […]

  • Steve Hughes & Howard Marks at the Giggling Guiri Barcelona Comedy Club ‹ Homage to BCN
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  • John Keville
    Posted at 15:34h, 02 March Reply

    Miss a meal if you have to, but don’t miss a book. Jim Rohn

  • John Keville
    Posted at 15:34h, 02 March Reply

    Miss a meal if you have to, but don’t miss a book. Jim Rohn

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